The Angione Report: via Firefighting.com

Charles Angione, former Operations Chief for the City of Plainfield (NJ) Fire Department, author of Days and Nights of Fire, decorated 25-year line veteran, long time incident commander of note and National Fire Academy Alumnus writes in his column in Firefighting.com in part;

“….police lieutenants who sat at desks and worked on administrative support and supply functions were considered true leaders, while fire captains who got their hands dirty leading their people into fire buildings were somehow less so. Chief officers, the reasoning followed, should therefore be as far removed from firefighting as possible, where they are just too close to their men. Who knows how many lost structures, injuries and, perhaps, even fire deaths can be attributed to taking our most experienced and capable officers off the firefighting force….”

I encourage all persons in the fire service to read his (fire related) works including his book.

1 Comment

  • Steve Jones says:

    Greetings!I wanted to let you know that the First Response Coalition (FRC) has added you to our “blog roll,” and I invite you to link to us, as well.The mission of the FRC is to educate the public on the needs of first responders. Our primary issue of concern is communications interoperability. As you are probably aware, many public safety agencies are unable to communicate with one another because their communications equipment is often incompatible (i.e., many first responders operate on different radio frequencies and use different radio technologies.)The lack of communications interoperability can have deadly consequences. As the 9/11 Commission pointed out, the inability of the NYPD to communicate an evacuation order directly to the FDNY resulted in the tragic loss of over 120 New York firefighters. I invite you to visit our website and check us out. Please feel free to post comments on our blog, and be sure to read our new report which assesses whether first responder communications throughout the southeast are prepared the 2006 hurricane season.Best Regards, ~ Steve